Russell Advert
Pelgar old banner
Poster call

Insecticide Treated Bednets for Malaria Control

| September 2, 2016
Pyrethroid resistance in Arican malaria vectors in Africa from 1984–2004 (left map) and 2005–2015 (right map). Red dots show resistant populations according to WHOs definition following exposure to a discriminating dose; yellow dots show possible resistance; green dots show susceptible populations. Reproduced from IR Mapper with permission of IR Mapper, March 2015.

Pyrethroid resistance in Arican malaria vectors in Africa from 1984–2004 (left map) and 2005–2015 (right map). Red dots show resistant populations according to WHOs definition following exposure to a discriminating dose; yellow dots show possible resistance; green dots show susceptible populations. Reproduced from IR Mapper with permission of IR Mapper, March 2015.

Mosquitoes have been disturbing humans ever since both have co-existed. The earliest records of nets being used to protect people from mosquito bites are from ancient Egypt, but it was not until the early 1980s that the first trials of insecticide impregnated bednets took place. As evidence for the impact of insecticide treated nets (ITNs) on malaria grew, along with the political commitment to win the fight against malaria, technological developments led to a commercial market for long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs). Over a billion LLINs have now been distributed in Africa and have been largely credited for reducing malaria cases there by 60%, but the use of one class of insecticide (pyrethroids) in LLINs, has led to growing insecticide resistance in malaria vectors. This, in turn, is threatening the enormous gains that have been made. The arrival of the next generation of LLINs will require not only the technology but also the political will and funding to enable scale-up in the countries that most need it.

This is an abstract of the full article published in: Outlooks on Pest Management – June 2016 issue.

The full text of this article is available to subscribers of Outlooks on Pest Management.
Non-subcribers may buy & download full text article.

Author: Helen Pates Jamet, Head of Entomology, Vestergaard, 1020 19th St NW, Washington DC, 20036, USA

Tags: , , , , ,

Category: Public health

Certis_728x90